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I managed to finish my second Linden sweater using the beautiful Atelier Brunette fabric I bought at the Knitting and Stitching show. Overall I’m pretty happy with my first attempt at sewing with sweatshirting. I was able to finish this project in time to take it on a mini break to Barcelona.

I was so glad to have an extra layer since it was a surprisingly chilly weekend in Spain. It would not have been my first choice of item to wear at the quidditch tournament I was playing at, but it was a welcome addition.

I think Linden brought us some luck because we won! I got a gold medal to match the golden flecks on the fabric.

I had hoped to get to a sewing cafe to use an overlocker for this project, but I didn’t have time in the end. I think an overlocker would have produced a better result. However, I did make a mistake with the neckband (put the seam at the centre front), which would have been harder to rectify if I had used an overlocker. I didn’t have the time to fix the neckband at the time, but I will replace it in future if it bothers me.

I don’t think it was a good idea to cut the sleeves on the cross-grain so I wouldn’t do that again. I don’t think the sleeves being on the cross is causing any huge issues, but still. On the plus side, I now have enough fabric left to make a colour-blocked version.

Details and costs

Fabric: 1.7m Atelier Brunette terry- £38.25

Pattern: Linden by the Grainline Studio- £14.90 (second use)

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It feels a bit wrong to be sewing a sweater after ten years of knitting nearly all of mine. This project jumped to the top of my queue because I’ve got a weekend away in Barcelona coming up and I think this will work better as a layering option than a knit sweater.

I’m planning to make the version without the band at the hem. I find that sweaters that pull in at the hip emphasise parts of my body that I don’t like. I have a sweatshirt from Uniqlo that has precisely this problem. I’m hoping that having more of a straight line will be more skimming and give me the silhouette I prefer- it certainly works in the wearable toile I made. It was useful to measure the Uniqlo sweater (the only raglan sweatshirt in my wardrobe) to give me a sense of the dimensions I’m aiming for.

Uniqlo sweatshirt dimensions

Sleeve length (good) 27″

Bust (a bit roomy) 21″ measured flat

Front length without band (decent length) 17.5″

The pattern says to use ribbing, but a lot of the versions of Linden on Instagram use self-fabric and it looks good.

I managed to get all of the pattern pieces out of 1m of fabric, but that did mean having the sleeve cut perpendicular to the other pieces. I think 1.7m (as stated in the pattern) would be needed for a directional fabric, though that would mean quite a lot of waste.

Costs

Fabric: 1.7m Atelier Brunette terry £38.25

Pattern: £14.90 (second use)


I managed to finish sewing my wearable toile of the Grainline Studio Linden sweatshirt and I’m absolutely thrilled with the result.

Let’s pretend I’m trying to look edgy here, rather than having remote issues

As I mentioned in my last post, I was a bit worried about how the jersey and scuba would play together. There was some puckering around the neckline due to the very different weight and stretch of the two fabrics, but fortunately this isn’t too noticeable when wearing. You can see it in the pic below.

I love the look of View B of the sweatshirt with no binding at the bottom- I really don’t like that shape for my body. It’s worth noting that the length is pretty short- when I raise my arms, my midriff does get exposed and I have a short body. It’s hard to judge whether the 6 is the correct size because of the amount of positive ease. I think I will wear a little more before deciding on the size for my next Linden.

I think I will have a go at making the next one using an overlocker. The domestic machine actually handled this pattern fine, but I think I would like a more professional finish when I’m using the expensive Atelier Brunette fabric.


At the Knitting and Stitching Show, I bought some beautiful sweatshirting to make my first Linden. However, having fabric issues with my third Lark made me realise that it probably wouldn’t be wise to use such beautiful (and expensive) fabric without a bit more testing.

I bought this printed jersey from Sew Over It around a year ago. I fell in love when I saw it in their newsletter. even though I wasn’t so sure when I saw it in person, I bought 1.5m since I had schlepped all the way there. My initial plan was to make a long-sleeved Lark but I realised very quickly that it would be too much of the print. I’ve kept a small sample of the fabric with me ever since, hoping to find a matching plain navy jersey but no luck.

When I was looking through my remnants for something to take to the boxy bag workshop, I rediscovered the textured dark navy jersey remnant. This piece was purchased from SOI as well and had been a real bargain (£5).

I’ve decided to put the two together to make a wearable Linden toile. I plan to use the nautical stripe for the front and back, broken up by the dark navy sleeves and collar. The fabrics are quite different weights. I’m just going to hope that doesn’t cause any problems.

I’m quite happy with my plan. I will get to try out the Linden to see how I like the neckline (necklines are my current big thing). I can also see how I like sewing it on my domestic machine. My Lark woes have me thinking it might be worth using an overlocker at a sewing cafe for constructing basics from stretch fabrics.

I decided to cut the size 6. Now that I have cut it, I’m pretty sure that the dark navy fabric is scuba. I understand that Linden is pretty straightforward to put together so I’m hoping to finish this soon.

Costs: Around £30

Textured navy fabric: £5 for 1.1m

Boat print fabric: Around £20 for 1.5m

I used around half a metre of each fabric

Pattern: £14.90


I’ve wanted to take part in the series of sewing workshops to make the 1960s coat for ages, but the time was never right. At first, I was not an experienced enough sewist to undertake such a complex project. The workshop then became unavailable for an absolute age. So, when I saw that it was up and running again, I booked straightaway. I’ve been wearing some incarnation of a red coat for more than ten years now and my current version is really threadbare. I would have liked to replace it two seasons ago but red coats are not easy to come by. Now I’m going to try and make my own.

coat

Photo taken from the Sew Over It website.

The course notes state that 3m each of fashion fabric and lining, so the first step was to go shopping. My job semi-regularly takes me near the Goldhawk Road and I hoped that this was where I would find the perfect red wool. I didn’t have a huge amount of time, so I just headed to my best-loved shops. I was tempted by a bolt-end of red crepe in Misan West- £50 for 5m was a bargain, but wool crepe isn’t really right for a winter coat. They also had some nice red wool with a sort of herringbone pattern (£35/m) that was my only other option.

Goldbrick Fabrics is my favourite shop on Goldhawk Road. They have a great selection, good customer service, which is very important to me, and they didn’t let me down. The woman who helped me pulled out a sample of a wool and cashmere mix that was utter heaven. A stunning shade of pillarbox red that felt as beautiful as it looked. I balked a little when I saw that it was nearly £80/m, but I had to have it. Yolo. The lady was willing to negotiate, so I thought it made sense to buy my lining there too. I am a huge fan of a jazzy lining, so I had to have this patterned purple viscose.

All in, I spent £220 on the fabric for this coat. The course was just over £160, which means that by the time I get buttons and interfacing, I will have dropped more than £400 on my new coat- double what I spent on my last (red wool and cashmere mix) coat from John Lewis.

I like to be clear about prices because people often don’t realise the cost- both financial and in terms of time- associated with being a maker. On the other hand, this is a wonderful opportunity. I will spend twelve hours in the company of an expert dressmaker learning how to make something that is literally tailored to my body and my style. It makes sense to invest in fabulous fabric when I have someone so experienced to guide me through the process of creating this garment.

I had to leave the workshop early (for very exciting reasons that I hope to be able to reveal soon) so only managed to alter the pattern.

I think my whole Sunday will be spent cutting and ironing!

Week 2


My first Southport dress turned out to be a fairly straightforward and rewarding sewing experience. I realise the waist tie is way too long but for some reason I wasn’t ready to cut it when I wore this dress for the first time.

Here’s a side view. This dress has been great to wear in the recent heatwave in London. Only one metre of light, breezy cotton, yet it’s formal enough that I feel comfortable wearing it to work.

Pockets are life.


Notes about the changes I made can be found here.

Pattern: Southport dress by True Bias

Fabric: 1m Liberty tana lawn


I’m in two minds about continuing with my WiP Wednesday posts, but I do find them to be a useful space to keep notes about different projects. After a lot of research, I bought the Southport dress pattern. We had a very warm couple of weeks, and I realised that I’m lacking in summer clothing. I want to finally use one of my pieces of Liberty fabric for this dress, so I decided to make a toile of the bodice.

It seemed a bit of a shame to use this lovely mustard fabric just for a toile, but I had a very small remnant and it’s cotton, so I couldn’t really picture a good use for it.

I omitted the button band from the bodice- in similar RTW dresses, the buttons gape. Also, I am making this version in a print.  I think the buttons would either get lost, or distract from how nice the fabric itself is.

My neckline wasn’t very flat on my toile. Fortunately I decided to read a tutorial about bias binding necklines, and realised that I had misunderstood the directions when making my toile. This misreading meant that I skipped under-stitching the binding. I’m hoping that this step, plus following some of the other tips in the tutorial, will make my final neckline beautifully flat.

Notes for the next iteration:

  • Size 8 fit is ok
  • Remove length from the back bodice (I will do this by cutting it straight rather than on a curve)
  • Move bust darts down by 1cm and out by 1cm (position of size 18 dart)
  • I also took a teeny wedge out of the neckline
  • 1m is plenty for my size in the shorter length

I get why pattern companies do it, but I must say that the massive overestimation of fabric requirements in almost every pattern I’ve used is a real bugbear of mine. Every time I plan a project, I have to scour blogs to get a sense of the true fabric requirement. Stated yardage often isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on.

Aside from the cost of fabric (Liberty tana lawn is over £20/m, though I got this for half price) I absolutely hate wasting things. I also don’t like having fabric lying around, either in half-metres that are hard to use, or in prints where I would not really want two matching garments. This is why I always state how much fabric I use, as my placement is generally much more efficient than the guides given in the pattern.

My second attempt at the neckline still stands up slightly. I wonder if this is because the binding I used is a heavier cotton than the main fabric. I might try making my own bias strip if I try this pattern again. I decided to use French seams on the bodice. It suddenly occurred to me that not only does it look better, it uses much less thread and is probably comparable time-wise to using my overcasting foot.

Pattern: Southport dress by True Bias

Fabric: 1m Liberty tana lawn