A panoply of (sometimes) lovingly handmade crud.

Tag Archives: pretty

I’m a bit sad to say there’s still a lot of work to do on my ultimate shirt after a couple of hours of homework plus my final three hour class at Sew Over It.


I’m happy with how the hand-stitching inside my collar turned out so I’m going to do the same on the cuffs. It’s painstaking work.

As well as attaching one cuff and finishing both, I have all of my buttons to do (having not sewn a buttonhole in years, if ever) plus the hem, which I’m very worried about. I failed twice at hemming my turquoise shirt and I still haven’t finished it.

I know I need to put the time in on this project soon, otherwise it will just languish half made in my pile of unfinished things. However, with the schools starting back next week and a few things on the cards, I’m not sure when I’ll be able to put in the hard graft in front of the sewing machine.

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Part 3: After the wedding

This is where most of the work and creativity in this project lies, as well as a lot of the fun.

Create your centrepiece

Wedding quilt central embroidery

See this post for further information.

Buy batting and fabric for the trim and backing, if you haven’t already

I spent a long time looking for flannel or brushed cotton for softness and settled on this baby-friendly bunny print. I had to improvise slightly and use some binding fabric either side as the fabric wasn’t as wide as the quilt.

Prepare squares

Check and double-check the instructions on the fabric pens. You may need to iron the design onto the fabric in order to make it colourfast.

I had to iron mine for five minutes. 50 squares. For five minutes each. Yep.

Decide on final design

Lay your squares out so you can see what your finished quilt will look like. I decided that I didn’t want any matching prints to touch each other. I wanted an even balance of colour too.

Here’s an early draft.

Here the balance is off, with more light patterns at top left and more dark bottom right. I later realised I had enough white squares to make an alternating pattern, which helped with balance.

If you can’t keep your squares laid out like this for the duration of the project, pick them up in order, row by row so that you can sew them together in your chosen pattern.

Sew squares together

Mum convinced me that we should overlock the squares together. While this gives a strong seam, I would recommend using the sewing machine. It’s easier to stretch the fabric in undesirable ways when overlocking, and I think simple machine stitching would have given a more uniform result.

Also watch your seam allowance and try to keep it uniform even if this means cutting people’s messages. Unevenness will come to bite you in the arse later, mark my words.

I sewed each column together first, marking their order with post-its.

Then carefully pin or baste the column together.


And stitch the columns together.

Press

Iron your patchwork thoroughly. Do not iron seams open as this can allow the batting to come out. Instead, iron towards the darker fabric.

Also iron your backing fabric.

Assemble quilt

On a large, flat surface, lay your backing out RS down.

Lay your batting on top.

Finally, lay out the quilt on top, RS up.

Carefully pin and/or baste all three layers of quilt sandwich together, starting in the centre and working out. This step is essential for a neat final result.

Topstitching time

It’s time to stitch the quilt together. You must use a walking foot on your machine. Seriously. Again, use the start in the centre and work out rule-of-thumb. Don’t sew top to bottom or left to right. Instead, start in the middle and sew to the edge.

Roll the quilt up like a scroll to make it easier to fit into the crook of your machine.

This will also help with not sewing multiple quilt layers together, which happened to me and was infuriating.

Also stitch or overlock around the edge of the quilt to aid with the binding.

I’m in a bind

Make your own if you’re a masochist like I am. Follow an online tutorial. I was going to write one but I don’t think I used the best method.

Start by stitching the binding to the back of the quilt. I followed this tutorial for mitered corners, which I think looks pretty good and was nice and clear. This is how my corners turned out.

Mitered corner

Here’s what the back looked like at this stage. Apologies for blurred pic, it was raining.

Flip the binding over and top stitch.

Finishing

Snip off all of your loose threads and basting stitches. Neaten the corners with hand-stitching if you need to. Rejoice, for you are done!

Here I am presenting the blanket to the bride, who by this point had been married for nearly six months. Oops.