A panoply of (sometimes) lovingly handmade crud.

Tag Archives: double gauze

I finished sewing my Bettine dress!

I made a few alterations to the pattern, including a full bust adjustment. I included a bit more information about the changes in my previous post.

Overall, I think this is a great pattern. The only minor comments I would have is that my neckline gapes a little, and I find there is a bit too much ‘blousiness’ in the bodice- I will shorten it in future.

Although I’d read that double gauze can be translucent, I thought I’d be alright because the double gauze I bought from the same supplier before was solid. All I can say is, white makes fools of us all!

I think the biggest issue is likely to be that the fabric creases quite badly. I’m just going to have to live with that as I seldom iron when I’m not sewing!

Pattern: Bettine by Tilly and the Buttons

Fabric: 3m double gauze, 108cm wide


I’ve loved Bettine pretty much from first sight. I was unsure about buying the pattern as I read a few blog posts that weren’t entirely positive about it, but I finally took the plunge last year and picked it up with three metres of beautiful double gauze. It’s by the same people that made the fabric for my unicorn top.

I had hoped to make this dress for my Brazil trip last year, but I bumped it in favour of my spur-of-the-moment zebra shorts

After reading even more blog posts, I decided to make some modifications to the pattern. This involved tracing a pattern for the first time ever. It took ages, but it’s nice to know that I still have the original pattern if my adjustments turn out to be a disaster.

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I curved the waist seams following this post. I also found this post by Tilly herself very helpful, and I did my first full bust adjustment.

The first stage of the dress is constructing the bodice. This is fairly straightforward. The neckline stitching is a little fiddly. I found the most difficult bit was easing the side seams, which is only necessary because of the FBA. However, having tried on, I’m very happy I made the adjustment.



I’ve also constructed the pockets. This material is quite transparent, so I’m going to have to buy or make a half-slip to wear underneath. As you can see, I managed to mess the left pocket bag up slightly. I’m hoping that adding another centimetre to the front seam allowances in that area on both sides (marked by the pins) will fix this as it would be very time-consuming to rectify this error.

So far, I’d say that this dress has mostly lived up to the promise of being a straightforward sew.


After a stressful few months, I decided that I would finally treat myself to a sewing machine. I’ve been getting more and more into sewing over the past couple of years, so it just makes sense. For anyone considering buying a machine, I really recommend getting advice from John Lewis. I found it much more helpful then trying to get my head around online reviews.

Anyway, here is my first make.

Overall, I’m somewhat happy with it. The fit is quite good, but there are armhole issues- you can see my bra. I had heard that double gauze is more drapey than ordinary cotton, which is true, but it’s probably still a bit too structured for this style of top.

I think the fit is okay. I prefer my clothing a little more fitted than this, but I think the fit is fine for this style of top. It might be the sort of top that is useful for travelling. I also think it would be cute tucked into something.

I shortened the front piece by over two inches after trying on. I have a short body. I also shortened the back over an inch- thought it would be nice to have an asymmetrical hemline. I botched the hem a bit by (I think) stretching the fabric while I was sewing. Curved hems are hard, and I don’t really know what I’m doing. I can’t be bothered to fix it now, but I might one day. I had hoped that ironing would sort it out, but it didn’t.

Going to test drive this a bit more, but I have a feeling it will be my last Silk Cami. I have a bit of a gap in my wardrobe for vests, but I think I will be looking for a different pattern to plug that gap.

Pattern: Silk Cami by Sew Over It

Fabric: 1.25m of double gauze


Fortunately everything does seem to have gone okay with my move, and I’m getting settled into a little house, for the first time, south of the river (Thames, for any curious non-British readers).

I did the cutting out before I had actually bought my sewing machine. This now brings the tally of projects I have cut out but not started to three. Think I had better actually sew something before I cut anything else out. This Japanese double gauze was pretty expensive, so I decided to take a risk and buy only 1.25m, and I’m very glad that I did! I was able to squeak all of the pieces out, with very little stress. If you’re looking at this post to see how much fabric you need to buy for a Silk Cami, please note that buying a smaller amount will only work for non-directional prints. If you’re using a directional print, you should probably stick with the amount of fabric stated in the pattern.

At the rather disastrous Intro to Drapey Fabrics workshop at SOI, the instructor kindly gave me a modified pattern to take away. In every other SOI pattern I have used, I have been a size 10 despite my measurements often being very different to those stated. In general, I always wear a size 10 in RTW clothing too. So I felt fairly confident cutting the 12 in the Silk Cami. This was a big mistake, and the finished garment really pulls across the chest, which is why I have never worn it.

Anyway, I didn’t really look before I started cutting (this could prove costly) but the pattern I now have is basically the 12 in the shoulders, with the 14 measurements in the sides. Fingers crossed it will fit!

Pattern: Silk Cami by Sew Over It

Fabric: 1.25m Japanese double gauze from Fondant Fabrics