A panoply of (sometimes) lovingly handmade crud.

Tag Archives: black

I’m so excited to start a new sewing project. I haven’t had any time to sew for ages. I bought this fabric at least 18 months ago. I was inspired when I saw a similar fabric on Instagram, made up into a very cute top. This is my favourite leaf shape- I have three pieces of jewellery and a shirt featuring it. When I saw this in the Sew Over It fabric e-mail, it caught my eye straightaway. I won a Sew Over It voucher wearing my monstera blouse, so why not use it to make another?

The prizewinning picture

This is the fabric. I bought 1.5m, which cost just over the £25 my prize voucher covered.

This project initially got hijacked by another sleeveless top project. This provides yet more evidence that I need to start projects very soon after buying the materials, otherwise I risk losing motivation.

I was a little torn between making another version with sleeves or a breezy sleeveless top for summer. I decided to opt for sleeveless. I didn’t wear short-sleeved tops to work for a long time because I was self-conscious about my tattoo, but I’m getting over that. I think I will add buttons to the front opening- I love an excuse to find tiny cute buttons- but omit the patch pockets. I think they will interrupt the beautiful large-scale print. Also pockets like that are useless. I’m very practical when it comes to clothing, so any details like frills, ruffles and decorative pockets aren’t for me.

When I first resumed sewing, I was all about the FBAs (full bust adjustments). I made my first adjustment on one of the very first dresses I made- a Tilly and the Buttons Bettine. I was excited by the prospect of properly fitting tops. However, more recently I have felt… almost resentful of having to make them. It’s hard to say why. For some projects, it doesn’t matter, but it is pretty important in this top. The olive version (size 12) I made is a little gapey in the shoulder region, while the white version (linked above, size 10) is too tight across the chest. It is very clear that a FBA is needed and so I decided to bite the bullet.

I traced off the front pattern piece and followed this tutorial for a full bust adjustment. I made a 1″ FBA, which will give me 2″ of extra wiggle room.

I followed this tip from Karen at Did You Make That and split the bust dart since it’s over 8cm. I kind of just eyeballed the split so I hope it’s going to look nice.

One slightly odd note is that when I marked my bust apex, it was higher than the original point in the pattern- you might be able to make out two small pink ‘x’s in the image above. However, a larger bosom is more subject to the effects of gravity, so normally the bust point would be lower. This theory is borne out in the fact that the darts on my two previous TC1617s are too high.

Even though I tried remeasuring a few times, I couldn’t figure out what I was doing wrong and just moved the bust point down by an inch or two. Again it was an eyeball job.

I’m hoping to get the fabric cut out before I go on holiday. I have to decide whether to try and sort a workaround for my lack of table at home (the only thing I think would work is sewing on the bench in the garden, but I don’t have a long enough extension cord) or avail myself of the sewing café at Sew Over It one Friday afternoon. I’m currently leaning towards the latter, though I am rapidly running out of free Fridays.

I really hope this blouse turns out nicely, since I would like to make another one from this beautiful fabric I couldn’t resist buying a couple of weeks ago.

I have now unsubscribed from the Fabric Godmother mailing list. I am too weak.

Costs

Fabric: £3.50

Pattern: Third use, original cost £3.22

Notions: Around £5

Total: Under £10!

Advertisements

I couldn’t resist this striped viscose when I saw it in the Fabric Godmother newsletter. I may have to unsubscribe- it tempts me too much. I knew that I wanted to make it into a simple long-sleeved top.

I considered lengthening the sleeves but in the end couldn’t be bothered because I wasn’t sure how long they need to be. I can easily make this change on future long-sleeved Larks.

I bought 2m of the jersey and have 85cm plus some large scraps remaining- more than enough for a second long-sleeved top. Because of the way I laid out the pattern pieces, it’s interesting to note that I would need 1.5m for one Lark but only 2m for two. It’s something I will think about with future fabric purchases since I’m trying to be less wasteful as a maker.

Once I got around to tracing the sleeve piece and cutting out the pattern, it only took a couple of hours to put this top together. I decided at the pattern cutting stage that I wouldn’t worry about stripe matching and I’m glad I didn’t.

If using such a light jersey again, I would shorten the neckband by at least 1cm. The band borders on being too long in more stable fabrics, and it was definitely too long here. I tried to redo it, but after spending about twenty minutes unpicking I had only managed to undo about 2cm and made a hole in the fabric. This fabric is so light and drapey that the scoop neck looks slightly droopy anyway, so I will probably keep this top mostly as an underlayer. I also had issues with the hems, so they don’t look great either.

I think I will make a second Lark in the same fabric, but using an overlocker. I will also try out the crew neckline. I feel quite comfortable with the construction of this pattern now, so would be a good first overlocker project. I would also like to see whether there are any differences in the finish.

Notes:

  • baste neckband to check fit before overlocking
  • use a press cloth with this fabric
  • lengthen sleeves by 2″
  • be careful buying jersey online

Costs

Fabric: £20.50

Pattern: Free (and this is my third use)


My love of lightweight knits means that most of my projects take me months from cast on to cast off. It’s nice to include the odd quick project in a heavier weight yarn, like the headband I’m working on now.

Before taking this photograph, I had snatched the left needle from the closing jaws of a Circle Line train after dropping it on the floor. It was like something out of Indiana Jomes. Who says knitting isn’t a hobby for the casual thrillseeker?

Knitting a black ribbed hot mess beater headband

I probably would have finished this by now had I not redone the cable three times. It just looked wrong each time. I’m going to blame the cold I had at the time.

img_0616

Pattern: Hot Mess Headband (free on Ravelry)

Yarn: Lana Grossa McWool Merino Mix 100 (less than one ball)

Ravelry project page