A panoply of (sometimes) lovingly handmade crud.

Category Archives: Knitting

I’ve been working consistently on my She Loves Wool sweater since picking it back up in the summer. I hope people don’t find these posts too dull, but I’ve been working on this project for so long and I don’t have that many other makes to write about.

I have now finished the front section and have moved back to working on the sleeves. I looked back at my previous post in which I blithely wrote that I was ‘nearly ready’ to start the colourwork on the first sleeve. I was nowhere near that point!

There is a lot of plain knitting to do once the sleeve increases are finished for the smallest size. I am mostly knitting on public transport or while watching TV at home so it’s not too bad but, as with the other pieces, still pretty dull.

The instructions state to knit the sleeve until it is 60cm long. This seems excessive. I have very long arms and they’re a little over 50cm from wrist to armpit. I’ve put the first sleeve back on hold at 21″, planning to re-check the length before starting the colour work. While I feel that I should follow my instincts and start the sleeve colourwork, I feel very apprehensive about deviating from the instructions. Normally I have to add length to my sleeves so it seems perverse to make them shorter than stated.

I took the time to check the sleeve length as accurately as possible. I pinned the sweater sections to my bra- the colour work is the same depth on all of the sections so the back is standing in for the sleeve. As you can see (I hope!) the sleeve looks good so I have proceeded with the colour work. I might even start putting the yoke together before finishing the second sleeve so that I can feel 100% confident about the length.

In more positive news, the neckline looks a lot better than I was expecting. The official pictures of this sweater all show the neckline being quite open, which I hate.

However, my neckline looks very different. I wonder if perhaps the sample was knitted in the largest size. Anyway, it gives me hope that I won’t have to make a lot of alterations because I’ve spent quite enough time on this sweater already.

Suddenly I am starting to feel like I am making good progress on this sweater so I am a lot more motivated to work on it. If all goes well I might even be able to wear it before Christmas.

She Loves Wool- kit from WatG * And Other Stories

Ravelry project page

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I’ve been working on a dish cloth using the hemp yarn I picked up in Kangasniemi.

I saved a few dishcloth patterns on Ravelry. My favourite was this one, which cost $2.50.

Deb Buckingham Designs

Although I believe in supporting designers, I also felt that it would be pretty easy to improvise my own similar pattern, so I did.

I think the dish cloth is too wide and I’m not sure about the gauge (might be better on 3.5mm needles). But then I’m planning to use this cloth to scrub my dirty plates so does it matter? I genuinely can’t decide and so I vacillate between starting again and continuing.

I’ll probably write up a pattern at some point. It’s been a very long time since I published a knitting pattern. My last one was this cute baby hat. I check Ravelry intermittently and there are 37 projects on there! It blows my mind that at least 37 people (not everyone maintains their Rav as religiously as me) have made hats based on my pattern.

Yarn: Java

Ravelry project page


I managed to see another inspirational exhibition in Helsinki. My flatmate and I were visiting our Finish friend and I read that we were just in time to catch the Grayson Perry show at the Kiasma gallery. I went to see his exhibition when I was in Bristol for a conference less than a year ago but was still keen to see more.

Kiasma in Helsinki

Folk Wisdom contained some different pieces to the last Perry exhibition I visited. Again, I was impressed by how prolific he is as an artist and how he brings methods that might be traditionally regarded as craft into the realm of high art.

I love Perry as a cultural commentator. The image below is just part of one of his huge tapestries, itself part of a series. However, it really captures an issue that comes up a lot in my work as a psychologist.

I’ve been noticing how artists that inspire me have included my current interests in their work. For example, the textiles on show at the Frida Kahlo exhibition I visited. Similarly, I was taken by the garments Perry had made.

I have been getting more interested in beading since doing some work on the vintage jacket I picked up. I’m hoping to do an embroidery and/or beading class at the Royal School of Needlework soon. I noticed that part of one of Perry’s tapestries was beaded.

While in Helsinki we were staying near an adorable LYS called Snurre. Of course I coudn’t resist possing in and my flatmate was very patient while I looked at every single skein in the shop. I had hoped to get yarn that was linked to Finland in some way but they were a little low on stock. I ended up getting this, which I plan to use for some new fingerless gloves/mittens to match my planned Kelly anorak, if I ever get around to making it. I impulse-bought the buttons, which are made from coconut husk and would be perfect for a cardigan.

I also picked up this hemp yarn at the local craft store in my friend’s hometown. I’m planning to use it to make some plastic-free kitchen scourers.

Finally, we managed a visit to the national craft museum in Jyvaskyla. I highly recommend it. It’s got lots of interactive exhibits, which are always a plus for me. I resent not being allowed to touch stuff in museums. I tried my hand at the loom pictured and I’m even more sure that I want to have a proper go at weaving.


After serving several weeks as my inspiration project, I hit a speedbump in knitting my Mermaid Humboldt sweater. I had a few flights coming up and needed a relatively easy project that I could work on while travelling. I returned to my hibernating She Loves Wool sweater. It’s been a good few months since I ground to a halt with the incredible monotony of knitting long row after long row of black stocking stitch. However, this was exactly what I needed to ease my anxiety on the plane- and simple enough that I could start the new season of Orange is the New Black at the same time.

After a long weekend spent in France with my dad, I had nearly finished the black section of the front.

I am now coming up to what I think will be the most challenging aspect of this knit- the neckline. There are no modelled pictures of anyone wearing a She Loves Wool sweater online. From the few photos of unmodelled sweaters, the neckline looks far too open for my liking. I am going to have to make some significant alterations to get it the way I want, which will mean lots of lifelines and I will also attempt to take detailed notes.

With that in mind, this project was becoming a little unwieldy for travel knitting. I decided to cast on one of the sleeves to take on my various summer holidays. I finished the second ball of black yarn and put the body on hold until I have some time to start working on the fair isle section, which I think I will enjoy.

The first sleeve- I had used up one ball of wool at this point. The sleeves were quite funny to knit. At first, they seemed to be going really quickly compared to the body sections. A couple of inches into the plain black stocking part, they seemed interminable. Then, all of a sudden they seemed super long and the first ball was nearly complete.

I hadn’t mentioned in my previous blog posts but I made one of my standard alterations to patterns and used a tubular cast-on for all of the pattern pieces. I just love the neat edge that it produces. I used the Ysolda method for the sleeve- can’t remember if I did the same for the body but it doesn’t really matter. A tubular cast on is one of those things I prefer to do at home rather than on the move as it’s quite fiddly.

The current status is that the back is complete aside from alterations, the first sleeve is  nearly ready to start the fair isle work and the second sleeve is my current travel knitting project. Since taking the photo, I have managed to start the fair isle on the front section too.

Pattern and yarn: She Loves Wool kit by Wool and the Gang

Ravelry project page

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I’ve been so busy writing about all my zero waste and cooking stuff that it could appear that I have not been doing any making. The truth is that I am working on a few things, but there isn’t much to post about. Sewing-wise, I am working on one project that I can’t write about yet and held up on another by a technology problem. I will have very little sewing time until September because I have a few trips planned. I can’t wait to get away, but I’m definitely a little frustrated by how little time I have been able to make for sewing.

Knitting wise, I am chugging away very slowly on my She Loves Wool. This project is probably the most suited to travel knitting, so hopefully I will make a bit more progress during August. I’m having a bit of time off from Mermaid Humboldt since I found it quite stressful to decide how I want the colours to look on the sleeves. I have also nearly run out of turquoise KidSilk Haze so I need to get some more.

ANOTHER unexpectedly time-consuming project has been shortening my League sweater. Although I wasn’t as ecstatically happy as I had hoped when I finished it, this sweater has turned into a great workhorse garment during the cooler months (i.e. pretty much all of them in London.) However, I have never been happy with the fit. I always finagle it for pictures so that it looks okay, but it is simply too long.

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I don’t like the way that the combination of relaxed sizing and additional length works on my body. Somehow it took me nearly two years to realise that I could make it shorter (facepalm emoji).

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Looking better already!

This project hit a bit of a roadblock after my Mermaid Humboldt made me realise that I could not re-knit the Titus yarn without washing and stretching it out first. I absolutely loathe winding yarn, so it took me about two months to get around to it.

I also wound the remaining yarn that I harvested from my blue ivy cardigan.

Very much regretting that I only cut the front of the sweater, which means I still have to unravel, wind, wash, hang and re-wind the yarn for the back.

On a more positive note, I have started re-knitting the ribbing on the front. I had to increase a few stitches because somehow my numbers didn’t add up. I’m fairly sure I haven’t dropped any stitches so no idea how that works.


Not long after writing my last blog post, I tried on my Humboldt sweater and realised that I wasn’t happy with how the gradient was looking. When I calculated how long I wanted each section of colour to be, I didn’t know that I had made a mistake when measuring my Port Charlotte sweater and therefore the dimensions were out. Also, the ribbing section is much more navy than turquoise, meaning that the turquoise section looked way too narrow.

The only viable solution was to rip back to where I finished the turquoise part.

This marl is pretty difficult to photograph! When I was looking yesterday, I couldn’t see much of a difference but now I can. I spent quite a bit of time examining the pattern schematic to try and think about the look of the gradient rather than just calculating it and I’m hoping this way will work out nicely. I will also have to think about how to do the sleeves, which will be much longer than the body.

I’ve managed to finish knitting the body and I think the length is looking as I want it. It feels so weird to be deliberately making a jumper too short!

I managed to cast on my first sleeve so that I could work on it on a flight. Despite the current heatwave in London, I’ve been making decent progress.

Now having a bit of a dilemma about how I want the gradient to look on the sleeves! Maybe it’s time for another lifeline…

Pattern: Humboldt by Anna Maltz

Yarn: Recycled Malabrigo sock and Kidsilk Haze

Ravelry project page


This project got a bit held up due to lacking in motivation to knit, but I’m glad that I persisted. Overall I’m really pleased with how this little cardigan turned out and the parents-to-be were happy to receive it too.

I think the pattern is really good. I powered along until I was due to start the buttonholes. I realised that I must have picked up the stitches from the wrong side, and reversing the instructions (though very straightforward) was too much for me at the time. After sitting in time-out for a while, I saw the yellow cardi languishing in my tweed basket (which in itself is an unfinished WiP) and decided to take a look at the pattern again. It only took me a couple of hours to finish off.

You can see the fabric isn’t totally even on the body. I have since found out that the uneven, almost striped, appearance is caused by ‘rowing out’- where you have different tension on your knit and purl stitches. I have since altered the way I purl, which will hopefully prevent this problem in future projects.

I took the cardi with me to the one place on Goldhawk Road that sells buttons. The shop didn’t have any small enough to not make the owls look a bit weird (although looking at this pic now, the size doesn’t look as bad as I thought). However, I did think that I’m not sure the buttons are really needed (side note: sewing 30 tiny buttons onto a cardigan doesn’t sound like that much fun). I also learnt that an Instagram poll isn’t the best way to make important decisions. Before anyone asks, I know than two people voted because I checked it a few times.

In the end, I decided not to go with buttons. But I did pick up these cute gold hearts as the actual fastenings.

Pattern: Wowligan by Kate Davies (I foolishly didn’t note down which size I made!)

Yarn: 3 skeins Buachaille in the Furze colourway, provided in kit from website

Ravelry project page