A panoply of (sometimes) lovingly handmade crud.

Category Archives: Baking

The most exciting thing I made from my latest OddBox was a rhubarb galette. I’ve just realised that I never got around to writing a blog post about that box, so here is a picture of the contents.

I don’t think I’ve actually cooked with rhubarb before, so I’m pleased with how my first attempt went. I adapted the pastry from the roasted vegetable galette I made and it worked really well. I’m a fan of the galette as a pastry format. So much less fussy than a pie.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup (150g) plain flour
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 1/4 cup ice cold water
  • Salt, a pinch
  • 3 cups rhubarb, cut into 1/4″ slices (about 4 stalks/250g)
  • 3/4 cup (125g) sugar
  • 2tbsp crystallised ginger, minced (I used this recipe to make my own)
  • Zest of one orange
  • 2tbsp plain flour
  • 4tbsp ground almonds
  • 1tsp vanilla extract

Method

Combine the flour, oil, salt and 1/4 cup water in a bowl. Stir to combine. Add up to 2tbcp water if the dough it too dry to come together.

Form into a ball, using a little flour of needed. Refrigerate for around 40 minutes. You can cover the bowl with a tea towel but it’s not necessary.

Preheat oven to 180C/375F.

Meanwhile, combine the chopped rhubarb, sugar, ginger, orange zest, vanilla and flour in a bowl and leave to macerate for around 15 minutes. No additional liquid is required.

Roll the pastry out on a floured surface, fairly thin and in a roughly circular shape. Gently transfer to your baking tray (roll it onto the rolling pin if that helps).

Leaving a 2″/5cm border, sprinkle around 4tbsp ground almonds over the centre of the pastry. This will help to soak up the rhubarb juice and prevent a soggy bottom.

Add the macerated rhubarb on top of the almonds. If the rhubarb has released excess liquid, use a slotted spoon to remove it from the bowl.

Fold over the edges of the pastry to form your galette. The pastry is quite robust and can tolerate being handled.

Add a sprinkle of Demerara sugar on top for an extra crunch if that’s your bag.

Bake in the preheated oven for 30-30 minutes. The crust should be golden and the filling bubbly.

Leave to cool on a rack for at least half an hour before serving.

The galette was delicious both hot (served with ice cream) and on its own cold over the next couple of days.

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I’m trying out a few new recipes. Changing my diet is inspiring me to cook differently, which has been fun. I also went to an amazing vegan supper club with my flatmate.

I’m definitely going to do Veganuary so I’ve also been getting a few recipes out of my system. Karelian/Carelian pastries (both spellings appear to be acceptable) were one of my favourite foods from Finland and I suddenly had a hankering to try making them last Friday.

Karelian pie sounds absolutely repulsive but tastes amazing. It’s thin rye pastry filled with savoury rice pudding and topped with egg butter. Lots of fat and carbs to help withstand the freezing Nordic temperatures. Or London in November.

I followed this recipe quite closely, using a mixture of arborio and pudding rice. I had around 1/3 of the pastry left, I believe because I put a lot of filling in each one. I considered trying to freeze the dough, but I think it will be a while before I attempt this recipe again so I just binned it.

The only plastic waste generated from these was the chive package. I had purchased the chives for a new black lentil recipe I was trying to use up my OddBox potatoes. I went to a greengrocer and Eat17 but neither place had them unpackaged and I wasn’t willing to go without.

Oh! I nearly forgot that I bought milk in plastic for this recipe too. I trialled making two of the Carelian pies with almond milk and they were nice but I made a slight mistake using a sweetened product. I think oat milk would work better.


This recipe is inspired by the rainbow pie with hazelnut crust featured in Straight from the Source, the magazine made by the bulk store I frequent.

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Ingredients

For the crust

  • 1.5 cups hazelnut meal/blitzed hazelnuts
  • 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 3/4 cup flour (I used ordinary plain flour, use tapioca flour to make this pie gluten-free)
  • 1 egg
  • 100g butter
  • A good pinch of salt

For the filling

  • 5 eggs
  • 2tbsp milk or cream
  • 3tbsp pesto (I used this recipe)
  • 1 small sweet potato, diced and roasted
  • 100g gruyere
  • 1 small courgette
  • 1 small yellow pepper
  • 30g spinach/red pak choi if you can get it
  • 1 red onion

Method

Note: You may be able to see from my pictures that I followed a slightly different method. Do as I say, not as I do!

Preheat the oven to 180C

Grease a 25cm pie tin. I used a 23cm one because that’s what I have and just meant the pastry was a little thicker.

Mix together the pastry ingredients until they form into a ball. Do not over-mix.

Press into the greased pie tin and bake for ten minutes. If you haven’t already, roast your diced sweet potato at the same time.

I allowed the crust to rise above the edges of the tin deliberately- the pastry burns very easily. This way, any blackened bits can easily be trimmed off at the end.

While the crust is cooking, finely chop the onion and cook in olive oil or butter until translucent.

Chop the other vegetables.

Layer the spinach, onion, pepper, sweet potato and courgette in the crust.

Beat the eggs with the cream/milk and pesto. Fold in the diced cheese and sundried tomatoes. Pour over the vegetables in the crust.

Return to the oven for 15-20 minutes, until the eggs are completely cooked.

I have to say that if I was going to bother to go to the effort of making a quiche again, I would be more likely to go for a quiche lorraine. But it was fun to try something new.


The stars aligned for one of my increasingly rare opportunities to bake. I was hosting a gathering at my house for my quidditch team, one of whom was having a birthday the next day. Since she is lactose intolerant, I decided to have a go at a dairy-free bake. I looked specifically for a recipe that still included eggs, since I’ve had mixed success with vegan bakes in the past. This Nigella recipe popped up on Pinterest, so I decided to give it a go. The cake is also gluten-free.

Cake1

The recipe states that the cake is best eaten warm, so I made the apple sauce in advance to save some time. The apple sauce was delicious- I might well make that again. I enjoyed this cake, especially considering it’s a ‘free from’ type recipe. Not the best pictures I’ve ever taken. I may have already started drinking when I was making this cake.

Candles


I froze some grated courgette because I wanted to have another go at making the chocolate courgette cake that I baked a few years ago. It’s based on a BBC Good Food recipe. I think I made a few errors when I was plagiarising it (slap on the wrist to past me), so maybe go from the original! Here’s a picture of the second attempt.

Something that’s really nice about having this blog is the ability to look back on my previous makes, and my thoughts about them. So interesting to see me describing myself as a ‘lifelong loather of the courgette’ when just over three years later, I am eating it on a daily basis.

I felt that the cake turned out a little bit dry this time- I think I shouldn’t have squeezed the courgette. I also think I over-baked the cake slightly. However, my colleagues seemed to enjoy it and one even asked for the recipe, so it can’t have been that bad.


In the past couple of weeks, my garden has started to produce a lot of courgettes. I got the seeds as part of a ‘funky veg’ kit and kind of just planted for the hell of it- I’m not the biggest fan of courgettes. However, I sense that my glut of yellow beauties may make me learn to love this humble vegetable. We’ll see how I do at the challenging task of not embarrassing myself with phallic references in this post. I am a follower of Freud, after all.

I turned my first fistful of small courgettes into a tasty salad. Adapted from this recipe.

I knew that my staff summer picnic would be a good excuse to use up some more courgettes. As you can see, these ones were much larger.

I made another salad for the party- this was actually my first time cooking and eating fennel. I selected a vegan recipe, but when the vegan in the team wasn’t at the picnic, I did add some cheeky feta. Cheese makes everything better.

I also made a courgette cake. Since I’ve blogged previously about chocolate courgette cake, I used this recipe as a jumping-off point.

The cake was lovely- light, moist and tasty. Would probably omit raisins next time. My favourite bit was the frosting, but then I am dangerously addicted to cream cheese frosting. I have a LOT more courgettes coming, so I need to stay ahead of the game with ways to use them.


I’ve been ill all week and decided to try and cheer myself up by making this peanut butter cookie recipe I spotted on Pinterest. I really like the fact that the recipe mostly uses oats with little flour. It’s hard not to get swept up in all the anti-gluten sentiment there is at the moment. Here’s how they turned out.

I had been looking for a new recipe to replace my current peanut butter cookie recipe, which somehow gives inconsistent results. I think I’ve found it. The cookies are really tasty even without the peanut butter filling.

I used ordinary creamy peanut butter rather than the fancy peanut butter stated in the recipe. I also used salted butter and omitted the extra salt. I would say these cookies have just the right amount of salt. I might even go so far as to use unsalted butter in future.