I’ve had my eye on the technique of putting coloured windows of boiled sweet into biscuits for a while, and I was inspired to try it out recently. The inspiration was winning a beautiful sequin-inspired necklace. I decided to make my own edible version.
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You will need

  • One quantity of cookie dough. You could try my nutty cookies, chocolate cookies or gingerbread cookies
  • Boiled sweets (hard candy). You’ll need 2-3 sweets per cookie Sandwich bags
  • Royal icing (recipe) or ready-prepared tubes of writing icing (optional)

Method

1. Prepare your cookie dough. Roll it out between two sheets of baking parchment, to about 0.5cm (1/4 in). I use cookie slats to make sure I get an even thickness. Chill the dough on your baking tray for about 30mins.

2. While the dough is chilling, crush your sweets. Put them in a double layer of sandwich bags or a sandwich bag wrapped in cling film. Use a hammer, the end of a rolling pin or similar to reduce them to a coarse powder. Crush each colour separately, unless you’re going for some kind of cool ombre effect.Don’t worry if you still have lumps in there, it’ll melt down in the oven.

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In Europe there are certain colours of sweet that are hard to buy. If you want blue in your stained glass effect, you can colour the shards of candy using a few drops of food colouring. It’ll get lumper but mine still melted down fine.

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3. Get your cookie dough out of the fridge and start cutting. Preheat your oven to 180C (350F) at this stage.
I used stacking cutters to make cookies with large openings. While this did work, I think the remaining dough was too thin to contain the melted sweets so I would recommend making sure that your cookie dough is at least 0.5cm (1/4″) thick for strength.

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Use an offset spatula, pictured below, or knife to remove the centre of the cookie.

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If you want your glass to be clean and free from cookie crumbs, transfer the shapes carefully to a clean piece of baking parchment.

4. Fill the spaces with your sweet shards. Pile them up quite high as they will recede as they melt down in the oven. For tidiness, brush any candy crumbs off the cookie dough before baking.

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5. Bake for 12-18 minutes, until cookie is slightly browned at the edges. Carefully remove from the oven. If any of the ‘glass’ has leaked during baking, you can very quickly transfer it back into the cookie while it’s still liquid but (obviously) be careful. It’ll harden quite quickly.

6. Leave to cool on the baking sheet. If you move it, the candy will all leak out and make a big mess.

7. Once completely cool, decorate further with icing if you want.

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